The Gifts of Hospitality

jesus_mary_josephDear Parishioners & Visitors,

Jesus loved Mary, Lazarus, and Martha. Working with daily and weekly
chores is a good. Prayer, including the comtemplation of Jesus’ face, is a good.
Both are necessary for our Catholic Christian life. Both Martha and Mary offered
hospitality to Jesus; this too is a good. Martha’s worry and fussing about her
sister’s lack of helping her with the dinner preparations is challenged by Jesus
because Martha is only seeing part of the picture and thus unfairly scolds her
sister Mary.

We possess within us the gifts of hospitality in prayer & works; and, these
form an amazingly powerful pair in leading a life of dedicated service in our faith
community. As many families and individuals together forming the Holy Family
of Jesus Christ here as Holy Rosary Church, we pray, we serve, and we share
as one. These activities are accomplished here every week as a family centered
in Christ Jesus. Just as each family must look to the economic realites of food,
clothing, shelter, and adequate health care, and, I might add, not unlike The
Holy Family, we, as members of the Body of Christ at Holy Rosary, must take
responsibility for good stewardship of our resources, all by God’s extravagant
graces. Three reports on our financial status are being provided. The first is this
present weekend, the second will be published in late August, and the third will
be published in October. From then on, there will be Quarterly Financial Reports.

God bless you in your magnanimity.

In God’s loving kindness,

—fr. Chris, O.P.

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The Samaritan’s Hands-on Healing

samaritan_traveler

Dear Parishioners & Visitors,

“But a Samaritan traveler . . . was moved with compassion at the sight.” While
the priest and the Levite pass by the severely injured victim because they
were afraid of becoming unclean or simply just didn’t want to get involved,
the merciful Samaritan is in possession of compassion and acts on behalf
of the man who was robbed and beaten. It is risky to love.

Consider the Samaritan’s hands-on healing response; his focus is
completely on the well-being of the bloodied and bruised man who is
absolutely vulnerable without assistance. The Samaritan’s response also
places the Samaritan himself in harm’s way since the robbers could be
lurking still. It is risky to love. He endangers his own life, pours oil & wine
to heal the wounds, carries the victim of violence on his horse, probably
offers him words of encouragement, gets him food & drink and a room at
a hotel offering payment for the man with the promise of more payment
as needed, and, finally, entrusts the wounded man to the innkeeper.

Who are the bruised, broken, and vulnerable around us as we travel
from here to there on our modern horses? With whom do I live or work
who is in need of a kind word, extra time together to talk things over, or
listening to someone who is sad and afraid about the violence of recent
terrorist activity? The Missionaries of Charity just down the road here in
Houston recently lost four of their Sisters living in Yemen to martyrdom by
terrorists. These four Sisters were caring for the elderly. It is risky to love!

In God’s loving kindness,

—fr. Chris, O.P.

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